France institute – Cerib http://cerib.org/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 01:07:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cerib.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile-120x120.png France institute – Cerib http://cerib.org/ 32 32 SDSU’s Charles W. Hostler Institute on Global Affairs Celebrates 80th Anniversary | Information Center https://cerib.org/sdsus-charles-w-hostler-institute-on-global-affairs-celebrates-80th-anniversary-information-center/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 22:09:45 +0000 https://cerib.org/sdsus-charles-w-hostler-institute-on-global-affairs-celebrates-80th-anniversary-information-center/ The campus and community come together to recognize the Institute’s legacy of facilitating robust intellectual discussion of challenging international issues. Audiatur and altera leave. It’s Latin for “Let the other side be heard” and it’s the motto of San Diego State University. Charles W. Hostler Institute on Global Affairs. Founded in 1942 in the […]]]>


The campus and community come together to recognize the Institute’s legacy of facilitating robust intellectual discussion of challenging international issues.

Audiatur and altera leave. It’s Latin for “Let the other side be heard” and it’s the motto of San Diego State University. Charles W. Hostler Institute on Global Affairs. Founded in 1942 in the midst of World War II, the Institute was created as a place of lively intellectual engagement on international issues. Although current issues have evolved over the decades, the Institute has never strayed from its goal of facilitating robust critical debate, especially on highly controversial themes.

Speakers from around the world included ambassadors, Nobel laureates and world leaders addressing areas ranging from international diplomacy and academia to national security and protest politics. Recent topics of discussion have included drone warfare and targeted assassinations, international war crimes tribunals, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, US foreign policy and Brexit.

On September 29, the president of the SDSU Adele de la Torre joined faculty, staff and community members at the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center’s Fowler Family Ballroom to honor the Institute’s 80th anniversary.

The event included a panel discussion moderated by the Director of the Institute Nancy Nicholsonin which three panelists each presented a retrospective on a segment of the Institute’s 80-year history.

“It is a privilege to carry on the legacy of such a revered piece of SDSU history,” said Nicholson. “The mission of the Hostler Institute is more important than ever. We are committed to fostering global conversations with the entire SDSU community, which makes me very proud of our work.”

In 2004, the Institute was endowed by Ambassador Charles W. Hostlerformer Adjunct Professor of Political Science at SDSU, and his wife Hostel Chinyeh, a former SDSU student. Charles Hostler was a decorated veteran, whose unit landed at Utah Beach in Normandy, France on D-Day in 1944. After his retirement as a colonel in the Air Force, he served in appointed positions for three governors of California, and as deputy assistant secretary for international trade in the Nixon and Ford administrations. In 1989, he was appointed United States Ambassador to Bahrain by President George HW Bush, a position he held for four years.

Ambassador Hostler passed away in 2014 and Chinyeh Hostler, who attended the 80th birthday celebration, continues the family’s legacy of generosity. Originally from Taiwan, Chinyeh Hostler is a successful businesswoman, having worked for major financial corporations and later running her own import and export business. Her work experience and business travels have made her passionate about learning about different people and their cultures.

“We are grateful to the Hostlers for their visionary leadership, and to the Institute’s leaders and lecturers for continuing this important, long-standing tradition on our campus,” said de la Torre. “In our increasingly polarized society, I cannot overestimate the importance of the Institute’s role in creating opportunities for healthy critical discussions.”

The Hostler Institute is now located at SDSU’s Fowler College of Business. It hosts two conferences a year in conjunction with the President’s Lecture Series, which are open to SDSU and larger San Diego communities.

For SDSU students, the Institute has created a course in Global Affairs and Diplomacy (MGT 403). A student also has the opportunity to be selected as a Charles W. Hostler Institute Fellow on Global Affairs, and students enrolled in Fowler College of Business or pursuing a major in international business can apply for Hostler Study Abroad scholarships based on merit. Current Hostler Study Abroad scholars are located in Switzerland, Canada, France, and South Korea.

“SDSU is a cross-border university that understands its extensive responsibility to global society,” Nicholson said. “It is fitting that the Charles W. Hostler Institute has spent 80 years developing international awareness, encouraging critical thinking, and pursuing diplomacy through education. I am confident that he will continue to contribute to our community and to the world for many years to come.

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Saudi Future Investment Initiative Institute strikes deal to support tourism https://cerib.org/saudi-future-investment-initiative-institute-strikes-deal-to-support-tourism/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 09:14:46 +0000 https://cerib.org/saudi-future-investment-initiative-institute-strikes-deal-to-support-tourism/ The Saudi Future Investment Initiative Institute (FII) has announced that it has reached an agreement to boost the tourism sector. It organized the “Priority Summit” in New York on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly. CEO Richard Attias presented the results of the global survey to determine the most […]]]>

The Saudi Future Investment Initiative Institute (FII) has announced that it has reached an agreement to boost the tourism sector. It organized the “Priority Summit” in New York on the sidelines of the 77th session of the United Nations General Assembly.

CEO Richard Attias presented the results of the global survey to determine the most critical priority for each individual.

The results revealed the priority in terms of population and continental composition to build an innovative roadmap to help humanity make the transition to help humanity survive and thrive in a complex new world.

– A different experience

Attias explained that the Foundation carried out this report in 13 countries to understand recent trends, which can monitor the emerging economies of countries that represent about 50% of the population and see them on the map shown for nations.

“In the top ten findings of the report, we noticed that people are very positive about themselves, as 77% of normal people in the countries were going in the right direction,” the CEO told SPA.

He pointed out that another analysis has been made which shows the relationship between optimism and GDP which can gradually improve the outlook of the citizen by paying attention to his priorities.

He said that 53% of high-income countries enjoy a nutritionally better life.

– Quality of life

Saudi Investment Minister Khalid al-Falih addressed priority investment sectors after the economic transformation the world is experiencing, highlighting the Kingdom’s efforts and plans to invest in industries focused on improving the quality of life.

The minister pointed out that technology has a significant and fundamental impact on investment, life and business interaction mechanisms.

“In light of the outbreak of the epidemic, it has been proven that the use of technology is important in addressing the challenges we face and providing opportunities for investors,” Falih said.

– Companies and individuals

Speaking at the summit, Governor of the Public Investment Fund (PIF) and Chairman of the Board of Saudi Aramco, Yasir al-Rumayyan, discussed the role of companies and investors in supporting the highest priorities. individual reviews.

In a plenary session with University of Pennsylvania Honorary President Judith Rodin, he revealed the difference between a crisis management approach and a crisis management approach that causes more crises.

The PIF plays an important role in boosting the Saudi economy, Rumayyan noted, noting that the Fund has a dedicated initiative to ensure the achievement of the goals set in the vision realization program.

– Tourism development

The Saudi Tourism Development Fund and the IFI have signed a strategic partnership agreement to work together to advance projects and initiatives in line with the Institute’s main focus areas.

It will also support the curation of the upcoming sixth edition of the FII Forum, to be held in Riyadh from October 25-27 under the theme “Impact on Humanity: Enabling a New World Order.”

The CEO of the Fund, Qusai al-Fakhri, explained that the partnership with FII will strengthen efforts between the two parties and jointly seek to encourage and support investment in the tourism sector in Saudi Arabia.

“We look forward to exploring together how the face of tourism is changing and how we can work with global efforts to make tourism growth sustainable,” Fakhri said.

The Fund’s partnership with the IFI demonstrates the Fund’s enthusiasm to contribute to the work of the Institute and its investment in the four essential pillars of sustainability, health, education, artificial intelligence and robotics. , upon which the Institute was founded.

The Tourism Development Fund was established to empower one of Saudi Arabia’s fastest growing industries. It aims to facilitate the access of local and international investors to tourism investments across the Kingdom.

The Fund’s efforts align with Saudi Arabia’s bold ambition to bolster the country’s reputation as a premier tourist destination.

– Trade

Separately, Trade Minister and Chairman of the Board of the Saudi General Authority for Foreign Trade Majid al-Qasabi held bilateral meetings in Bali on the sidelines of the G20 trade working group, the investment and industry.

Qasabi with trade ministers from Turkey, India, Argentina, South Africa and Russia.

During the meetings, opportunities for cooperation in investment and industry and increased trade were discussed.


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UL Research Institutes creates a materials discovery research institute; Appoints Dr. Stuart R. Miller as Senior Vice President and Executive Director of MDRI https://cerib.org/ul-research-institutes-creates-a-materials-discovery-research-institute-appoints-dr-stuart-r-miller-as-senior-vice-president-and-executive-director-of-mdri/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://cerib.org/ul-research-institutes-creates-a-materials-discovery-research-institute-appoints-dr-stuart-r-miller-as-senior-vice-president-and-executive-director-of-mdri/ NORTHBROOK, Ill., September 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — UL Research Institutes today announced its expansion to create the Materials Discovery Research Institute (MDRI)a new center of excellence for materials science safety. dr. Stuart R.Miller was named Senior Vice President and Executive Director of MDRI. Dr. Stuart R. Miller, Senior Vice President and Executive Director, Materials Discovery […]]]>

NORTHBROOK, Ill., September 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — UL Research Institutes today announced its expansion to create the Materials Discovery Research Institute (MDRI)a new center of excellence for materials science safety. dr. Stuart R.Miller was named Senior Vice President and Executive Director of MDRI.

“Through our new Materials Discovery Research Institute, we aim to identify and address new risks in materials technology and address emerging human health needs while supporting the safe, fair and fair of new materials in the world,” said Terrence R. Brady, President and CEO of UL Research Institutes. “Dr. Miller is the right leader for these ambitious plans. He brings extensive scientific experience and important team leadership to MDRI, supporting our ongoing efforts to increase the scale and reach of UL’s research institutes. “

MDRI will continue its research to understand how changes in the chemical composition and structure of materials can help solve today’s global security challenges. As part of its broader security science efforts, the institute aims to address environmental resilience and sustainability through the development and deployment of new materials and devices based on these materials. MDRI’s mission calls for reducing or eliminating the harmful effects of humanity’s dependence on fossil fuel resources and enabling an energy transition to renewable and sustainable sources by advancing materials technology and performance. MDRI is the fifth research institute within the UL enterprise, joining the Chemical Insights, Digital Intelligence Safety, Electrochemical Safety and Fire Safety research institutes.

As inaugural Executive Director, Miller will lead the MDRI vision, oversee the institute’s internal research, and expand collaboration with key academic and institutional research partners. His team will also be responsible for continuing education and engagement on the topic of materials safety with policy makers, manufacturers and consumers, ensuring they make informed decisions on adoption and implementation of specific technologies.

“Through MDRI, we are working to create and better understand the advanced materials that will help solve today’s complex risks to public safety, including the urgent challenge of producing energy resilience for a sustainable future,” said said dr. Christopher J. Cramer, Research Director of UL Research Institutes. “Dr. Miller’s considerable expertise in materials science innovation and problem solving will help us accelerate fundamental materials discovery.”

A recognized leader of interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers, Miller held various positions at Honeywell UOP for more than 10 years before joining the UL Research Institutes. Most recently, Miller worked as a senior executive and principal scientist, leading Honeywell UOP’s energy storage group. While at Honeywell, he established several labs that enabled all aspects of battery development. Earlier in his career, he worked in research at the UVSQ in Francewhere he was also a postdoctoral researcher.

“Each research institute within the UL enterprise is known in the scientific community as a center of research excellence, and I am honored to be the senior vice president and executive director of the Materials Discovery Research Institute,” said said Miller. “I look forward to joining the leadership team at UL Research Institutes as we dig deeper into the ways we support our mission to work for a safer world.”

Inventor or co-inventor of more than 30 U.S. and foreign patents, Miller is co-author of 24 peer-reviewed journal articles and one book chapter. Miller holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Dundee in the UK, where he graduated with honors, and a PhD in Materials Chemistry from the St. Andrews Universityalso in the UK He is from Scotland.

For more information, visit UL.org.

About UL Research Institutes
UL Research Institutes is a leading independent safety science organization with global reach. Dedicated to exploring vital issues related to public safety, we sense and act on the risks to humanity and our planet.

Since 1894, our trusted research has harnessed the ingenuity of the best minds from all scientific disciplines to design a safer and more sustainable world. Science builds the knowledge needed to mitigate increasingly pressing security issues like environmental and chemical pollution or artificial intelligence-related inequalities – and our rigorous, objective investigations reveal that knowledge.

Working with a global network of scientists and safety professionals, we define the safe and sustainable use of things ranging from legacy materials to new and emerging technologies. Our findings support the development of practical standards and policies by UL Standards & Engagement. Together, we advance the science of security for the greater good.

Find out more about UL.org

Contact:
Mimi Bhattacharyya
Director of Strategic Communications
[email protected]

SOURCE UL Research Institutes

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A delegation from IN2P3 visits Fermilab https://cerib.org/a-delegation-from-in2p3-visits-fermilab/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 14:05:53 +0000 https://cerib.org/a-delegation-from-in2p3-visits-fermilab/ A delegation of five members of the Scientific Research National Centerit is National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physicsled by IN2P3 Director Reynald Pain visited the US Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on September 2. A delegation from the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics in France visited Fermilab on […]]]>

A delegation of five members of the Scientific Research National Centerit is National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physicsled by IN2P3 Director Reynald Pain visited the US Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on September 2.

A delegation from the National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics in France visited Fermilab on September 2. From left to right: Berrie Giebels, deputy director of IN2P3; Hema Ramamoorthi, director of international engagements at Fermilab; Arnaud Lucotte, scientific director IN2P3 for accelerators; Reynald Pain, director of IN2P3; Lia Merminga, director of Fermilab; Whitney Begner, Deputy Chief of the DOE Fermi Site Office; Marcella Grasso, IN2P3 scientific director for nuclear physics and its applications; and Laurent Vacavant, scientific director of IN2P3 for particle and hadron physics. Photo: Tom Nicol, Fermilab

The delegation met with Fermilab management and scientists to discuss the IN2P3-Fermilab collaboration in the accelerator and neutrino programs. Visitors also got an insight into the lab’s quantum research, scientific computing efforts, and theoretical programs. IN2P3 is a major partner of the PIP-II Particle Accelerator Project and the international Deep underground neutrino experimenthosted by Fermilab.

Donato Passarelli (from right), Michael Geelhoed and Rich Stanek give the IN2P3 delegation an overview of the PIP-II particle accelerator project at Fermilab. French institutions have made valuable contributions to the development and testing of SSR2 superconducting cavities for PIP-II. Photo: Tom Nicol, Fermilab

The IN2P3 delegation also met virtually with Harriet Kung, Deputy Director of Science Programs in the DOE’s Office of Science and Acting Associate Director of the DOE’s Office of High Energy Physics. She thanked the delegation for its continued support and the substantial contribution of key technologies in the neutrino and accelerator programs.

French visitors listen to Thomas Strauss (right), who highlights Fermilab’s contributions to upgrading the Large High-Luminosity Hadron Collider. Photo: Tom Nicol, Fermilab

“IN2P3’s collaboration with Fermilab and their contributions to PIP-II and DUNE are examples of the importance of international partnerships in advancing accelerator technologies and global neutrino research,” said Merminga.

The delegation spent the day at Fermilab talking with scientists and visiting various research facilities. The visit allowed the delegation to see the progress of the LBNF/DUNE neutrino project and the PIP-II particle accelerator project. The tour included Fermilab’s work on superconducting cavities for PIP-II as well as superconducting magnets for the Large High-Luminosity Hadron Collider upgrade; assembly of the short-baseline neutrino detector and work on the upgrade of the CMS detector at the LHC. Visitors also toured the Center for Superconducting Quantum Materials and Systems.

Frank Chlebana (right), Deputy Head of the Particle Physics Division at Fermilab, briefs French visitors on Fermilab’s work on the CMS experiment at CERN and highlights opportunities for joint research and development efforts to the design of future high-energy particle colliders. Photo: Tom Nicol, Fermilab

In addition to Director Pain, IN2P3 delegates present at the visit included Deputy Director Berrie Giebels; Laurent Vacavant, Scientific Director for Particle and Hadron Physics; Arnaud Lucotte, scientific director accelerators, detectors and technology; and Marcella Grasso, scientific director of nuclear physics and applications.

The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is supported by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The Office of Science is the largest supporter of basic physical science research in the United States and works to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

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Coming out to conservative Gagauz society https://cerib.org/coming-out-to-conservative-gagauz-society/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 12:20:55 +0000 https://cerib.org/coming-out-to-conservative-gagauz-society/ Born and raised in Kopchak, a village of almost 10,000 people in the southern region of Moldova, Gagauzia, Andrey Kolioglo came out as gay in 2018. Four years later, he was granted asylum in France due to the danger he faced at home. “Hello. I’M GAY!…Yes I love boys and always have. God made me […]]]>

Born and raised in Kopchak, a village of almost 10,000 people in the southern region of Moldova, Gagauzia, Andrey Kolioglo came out as gay in 2018. Four years later, he was granted asylum in France due to the danger he faced at home.

“Hello. I’M GAY!…Yes I love boys and always have. God made me like this, there’s nothing we can do about it,” he wrote. on March 11, 2018 at a publication on VKontakte, a social media and messaging platform widely used in Russia and by Russian speakers. “[I came out] maybe because my life has been poisoned by your homophobia, maybe because I wouldn’t want that kind of [fearful] life to another guy… Please don’t treat other gay people as badly as you treated me.

Insults and threats poured in, warning that there was no place in the world for people like him. Not all of the responses were negative – “the messages of support comforted me and gave me hope”, he said – but the harassment even extended to Kolioglo’s family . Friends and relatives broke off relations with her parents, who eventually moved to another village.

“They suffered the same abuse [there]if not worse, Kolioglo continued. “Finding work has become difficult; my father was also attacked, even though he is a veteran of Afghanistan. My sister had a nervous breakdown after being fired because of me; she also decided to leave Moldova. Despite the social pressure, I have a good relationship with my parents, we communicate regularly, I help them as best I can.

Moldovan society is conservative. In 2012, the government approved an anti-discrimination law that protects people from discrimination, including on the basis of sexual orientation, but positive attitudes towards the LGBTI community remain weak.

The harassment a young conscript faced when his sexual orientation was discovered sets off debate in society and in political circles as he did suicide of a transgender teenager who had been bullied by classmates.

As the country of 2.6 million moves closer to the EU, however, acceptance is slowly growing. In June 2022, Moldova tenuous its biggest Pride march ever, with a heavy police presence but despite threats and misinformation from conservative groups. The turnout sent a rare signal of support to the LGBTI community.

In Gagauzia, the atmosphere is different. Comrat, the administrative center of 20,000 people, lies about 100 kilometers south of the capital Chisinau, but the cultural gap between the towns seems enormous.

“Our people will not accept these anti-Christian values.”

Sergey, a gay man in his 30s who asked to remain anonymous, said he dared not come out for fear of backlash, including against his family.

“I am sure that after coming out in Gagauzia, I will lose equal access to many things, including non-discriminatory protection from local law enforcement,” he told the IWPR.

“To live, dissatisfied, a life with a constant feeling of fear; that’s what you have to get used to here if you’re gay.

In May 2022, the assembly adopted a resolution banning LGBTIQ “non-traditional relationship propaganda”. The new bill states that the “traditional family” is the basis of Gagauz society, prohibits the promotion of “non-traditional relationships” and prohibits local media from publishing anything positive about same-sex couples.

“We realized that the central authorities of Moldova would try to organize an LGBT march in the autonomous region, so we took this decision to ban such marches [here]said Ivan Dimitroglo, a deputy in the assembly of Gagauzia, told IWPR.

No Pride marches were planned in Gagauzia, activists noted.

“They referred to the events planned in Chisinau. It looks like propaganda and manipulation,” Angelika Frolova, an activist with GenderDoc-M, an LGBTI community advocacy center, told IWPR.

As the Gagauzia resolution was contrary to the constitution of Moldova, it was taken to court by the Coalition for Inclusion and Non-Discrimination, a grouping of human rights organizations across the Moldova.

“It has no legal value, it is simply declarative, so it will not bring any changes. Gagauzia cannot have laws that contradict the constitution of Moldova,” Frolova noted. has not been returned.

The bill mirrors similar ones passed in the Russian Federation, with which the region has close ties. The lack of job opportunities many Gagauz migrate to Russia and three buses connect Comrat to Moscow. Russian is by far the most spoken language.

“Homophobia is deeply rooted in Russia’s authoritarian regime, which has used it successfully in the territories it influences, including parts of Moldova,” Kolioglo said. “People in Gagauzia are struggling and going back to the survival mechanism, rejecting all that is different and encouraging homogeneity. In other words, “anyone who is not like me is a traitor”.

Kolioglo decided to leave Moldova following the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

“I feared that Russia would commit acts of aggression against Moldova and I was afraid of the growing aggressive pro-war and xenophobic sentiments in Gagauzia and Transnistria. [Moldova’s breakaway region supported by Moscow]artificially created by the Russian propaganda machine,” he said.

The Gagauz authorities maintain that the resolution does not violate the constitutional right of assembly.

“We don’t forbid talking about it [LGBTI], what we prohibit is that they must not be seen. Our people will not accept these anti-Christian values,” Dimitroglo told IWPR.

In June, GenderDoc-M reward regional elected officials with the Plastic Basin, a fake symbolic trophy awarded each year to the most homophobic individuals and organizations.

Observers argue that the LGBTI issue is manipulated to divert public attention from issues affecting the region, including poverty and unemployment.

Frolova stressed that such an approach does not bring any benefits.

“Countries hostile to their citizens are doomed to poverty and underdevelopment,” she said. “Changing this country and making it a place where everyone feels happy and safe must be our common aspiration; otherwise we will continue to lose people and hope for the future,” Frolova continued, referring to Moldova’s high migration rate.

Although Andrey and Sergey are not optimistic about the short-term changes in Gagauzia, they believe it is important to keep fighting.

The pride march was an important statement of the community’s search for rights and freedom, Sergey said, adding: “We want to be heard, we want to show that we are members of our society and not outcasts or sick people. , as politicians sometimes call us.”

In Paris, Kolioglo is safe, but has not given up on advocacy for his community.

“When I say I’m gay, I’m standing up for my civil rights, I’m making a political statement,” he said. “Discrimination remains a daily food, it is impossible to escape it, but you can fight it.”

This publication has been prepared under the “Anti-disinformation project in Moldova”implemented with the support of the UK Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO).

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The Italian Cultural Institute in Cairo organizes a theatrical performance entitled “Egypt’s Word on Water” https://cerib.org/the-italian-cultural-institute-in-cairo-organizes-a-theatrical-performance-entitled-egypts-word-on-water/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 20:12:59 +0000 https://cerib.org/the-italian-cultural-institute-in-cairo-organizes-a-theatrical-performance-entitled-egypts-word-on-water/ On the occasion of Egypt’s hosting of the World Climate Summit COP27 and the meeting of leaders from all countries of the world to agree on how to intensify global action to solve the climate crisis , the Italian Cultural Institute in Cairo, directed by Davide Scalmani, hosted a theatrical performance entitled “Words of Egypt […]]]>

On the occasion of Egypt’s hosting of the World Climate Summit COP27 and the meeting of leaders from all countries of the world to agree on how to intensify global action to solve the climate crisis , the Italian Cultural Institute in Cairo, directed by Davide Scalmani, hosted a theatrical performance entitled “Words of Egypt on Water” by Samira Kirollos.

Davide pointed out that due to COP27, Egypt will be at the center of global attention in the coming months. He also added that the show deals with the stories of the Nile from the Pharaonic, Islamic and Greco-Roman eras, because Egypt is the gift of the Nile, the main source of water which is a precious gift that everyone must respect. and preserve.

The show was attended by Brazilian Ambassador Antonio Patriota, Argentinian Ambassador Eduardo Varela, Opera Ballet Director Erminia Gambarelli and many other representatives of the Egyptian cultural scene as well as distinguished guests.

Dr. Samira Kirollos performed “Egypt’s Words on Water” which includes three monodramas that underline the urgency of our active participation in the preservation of the precious drops of water with which nature has endowed us.

‘The Shipwrecked Sailor’, a Middle Kingdom story that pits optimism against pessimism, followed by ‘The Source of the Nile’, a story of obsession and determination set in the 11th century Islamic era century and ends with the tragic Greco-Roman story of Isadora of Hermopolis (Tuna el Gabal), a tale of two cities and young loves ending with a text inspired by Italo Calvino’s “Invisible Cities”.

Samira Kirollos is a world famous actress and writer whose works have been published. She was born in Egypt and has lived in London and the United States as a student and researcher. She trained as a ballerina and violinist, and also studied acting.

Although she is fluent in several languages, she presents her performances in English, French and Spanish.

Over the past thirty-seven years, Samira has presented countless theatrical performances in schools, universities, museums, libraries and theaters in Egypt, England, France, Latin America, the United States and in Japan.

Samira Kirollos’ stories are notable for their simple style and attention to the smallest details, which is due to the serious research that underlies her performances in her charming and compelling stories.

The audience interacts with the resurrected characters in a realistic way, even though they may have lived four thousand years ago.

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IAEA Report on Iran’s NPT Safeguards – September 2022 https://cerib.org/iaea-report-on-irans-npt-safeguards-september-2022/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:06:15 +0000 https://cerib.org/iaea-report-on-irans-npt-safeguards-september-2022/ House IAEA Report on Iran’s NPT Safeguards – September 2022 IAEA Report on Iran’s NPT Safeguards – September 2022 by David Albright, Sarah Burkhard and Andrea Stricker [1] September 8, 2022 Download PDF Summary Background Iran has consistently violated its obligations under its Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement (CSA), a key part of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty […]]]>

IAEA Report on Iran’s NPT Safeguards – September 2022

by David Albright, Sarah Burkhard and Andrea Stricker [1]

September 8, 2022

Download PDF

Summary

Background

  • Iran has consistently violated its obligations under its Comprehensive Safeguards Agreement (CSA), a key part of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and to fully account for its past and present nuclear activities.

  • For nearly four years, the IAEA has been investigating the presence of man-made uranium particles at three Iranian sites and seeking information on nuclear materials and activities at a fourth site.

  • In March 2022, the IAEA concluded that Iran breached its safeguards obligations for failing to declare its use of nuclear material at one such site, Lavisan-Shian. In June 2022, the 35-nation IAEA Board of Governors passed a no-confidence resolution against Iran for non-cooperation with the IAEA, with only China and Russia voting against.

  • This analysis summarizes and assesses the information contained in the IAEA’s latest report on NPT safeguards on Iran, published on September 7, 2022. It also provides background information on Iran’s former nuclear weapons sites making the subject of an IAEA investigation.

Results

  • Since the IAEA’s last report in June, there has been no progress or cooperation from Iran to resolve outstanding safeguards issues.

  • The IAEA requests “technically credible explanations” concerning the presence and origin of the uranium particles detected at the three sites, as well as “the current location or locations of the nuclear materials and/or contaminated equipment”. Thus, it is unlikely that the four locations publicly discussed by the IAEA are the only remaining sites in Iran with traces of undeclared uranium.

  • The IAEA concludes that as of September 2022, it is “unable to provide assurance that Iran’s nuclear program is exclusively peaceful”. This means that the IAEA cannot verify Iran’s compliance with its CSA and the NPT and implies that Iran is in violation of both agreements.

Recommendations

  • It is essential that the IAEA continue its investigation into Iran’s violations of nuclear safeguards under the NPT. In the absence of an immediate and marked change in Iran’s actions, the IAEA Board of Governors should pass a resolution condemning Iran’s non-cooperation, then refer the matter to the Security Council of the UN.

  • The United States and Europe should refuse Iran’s demands to end the ongoing IAEA investigation as a condition for a revived nuclear deal under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). The West should instead pressure Iran to cooperate with the IAEA in tightening sanctions, including enacting the so-called UN sanctions rollback, authorized for non-compliance by Iran from the JCPOA.

Latest report on NPT safeguards

For nearly four years, the IAEA has been investigating the presence of man-made uranium particles at three Iranian sites and seeking information on nuclear materials and activities at a fourth site. The four sites are Turquz Abad, Varamin, Marivan and Lavisan-Shian, previously designated by the agency as locations 1-4. In March 2022, the IAEA concluded that Iran breached its safeguards obligations for failing to declare its use of nuclear materials at Lavisan-Shian. Of the four sites of concern, three have been discussed in the Iranian nuclear archive.

It is unlikely that these four locations are the only remaining sites in Iran with traces of undeclared uranium. In reports and press briefings, IAEA Director General Grossi has expressed concerns about other unknown locations from or to which Iran may have moved nuclear materials or contaminated equipment.2 In addition, the IAEA may have identified additional sites to which it seeks access based on information contained in the nuclear archive. The IAEA has corroborated information in the nuclear archive against Iran’s mandatory declaration of nuclear materials and activities, in line with the IAEA’s mandate to ensure that Iran’s declaration is correct and complete . On September 7, the Institute released the location of another identified site in the nuclear archive, where Iran may have conducted tests using uranium.3 While the site was previously known, the Institute only recently obtained the coordinates of the site from officials knowledgeable about the nuclear archive. The site, called Golab Dareh, is one of four known sites associated with explosives testing of nuclear weapon components and the development of associated high-speed diagnostic equipment. This appears to be another site that may harbor traces of undeclared uranium, and there are likely others.

On March 5, 2022, the IAEA and Iran agreed on a timeline for Iran to provide the agency with information and explanations to clarify the IAEA’s discovery of man-made uranium particles at Turquz Abad. , Varamin and Marivan, a process culminating in a 2022 IAEA report. Under its legal nonproliferation obligations, Iran is required to explain the activities that led to the use or production of these nuclear materials. The IAEA noted, as in its previous report, that it “provided Iran with many opportunities, in different formats through exchanges and meetings in Vienna and Tehran, to clarify these issues, but without success”. . At the time of the Director General’s June report, Iran had not provided a technically credible explanation, and the IAEA reported that Iran had failed to meet the agreed timeline. This led the IAEA’s Board of Governors, made up of 35 countries, to pass a censure resolution against Iran at the June board meeting, with only Russia and China voting against.

In its latest report, the IAEA reported no further progress or cooperation from Iran, noting that “safeguards issues related to these three sites remained unresolved.” The report states: “…Despite the Agency’s stated willingness to engage Iran without delay to resolve these issues, Iran has not engaged with the Agency. Consequently, there have been no developments during the reporting period and none of the outstanding issues have been resolved. The Director General writes that he “is increasingly concerned that Iran has not engaged with the Agency on outstanding safeguards issues during the reporting period and, therefore, that ‘there has been no progress towards their resolution’.

The IAEA, in essence, reports that Iran is violating the NPT and will remain so until it cooperates. It “reaffirms that unless and until Iran provides technically credible explanations for the presence of anthropogenic uranium particles at three undeclared locations in Iran and notifies the Agency of the location or current locations of nuclear material and/or contaminated equipment, the Agency will not be able to confirm the accuracy and completeness of Iran’s declarations under its comprehensive safeguards agreement. , the Agency is unable to provide assurance that Iran’s nuclear program is exclusively peaceful.

The IAEA Board of Governors, which will next meet September 12-16, is expected to pass a new no-confidence resolution demanding Iran’s compliance with its NPT obligations. This resolution is expected to include a stipulation that if Iran does not cooperate by the next board meeting, the board will refer the matter to the UN Security Council for countermeasures.

The United States and its European counterparts, Britain, France and Germany (the E3), should reject Iran’s attempt to link the closure of the IAEA investigation to the renegotiation or to the re-implementation of the 2015 nuclear agreement, known as the JCPOA. Iran has demanded that the parties guarantee the closure of the investigation before implementing a new agreement. Moreover, if the parties lift sanctions against Iran before the day of re-implementation of a new agreement, Iran is unlikely to cooperate with the IAEA. Linking the JCPOA and IAEA investigation could also force a showdown with Iran at the IAEA that could end with the US and E3 board voting to preemptively close. investigation by the IAEA in order to reimplement the agreement, just as they did to implement the JCPOA in 2015. Director General Grossi, however, remained firm, saying there could be no political solution to his investigation.

Member states have a second chance to respect the NPT and send a signal to Iran, as well as other potential proliferating states, that they will not tolerate violations of the NPT. Their failure to act will undermine the authority of the IAEA, lead to the degradation of the NPT and other states seeking nuclear weapons.

IAEA/Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) Joint Statement

On March 5, following a visit by Director General Grossi to Tehran, the IAEA and the AEOI issued a joint statement to “accelerate and strengthen their cooperation and dialogue towards the resolution of [outstanding] issues.” The agreement aimed to resolve by the June 2022 board meeting the IAEA’s remaining questions about three undeclared Iranian sites where it found man-made uranium in 2019 and 2020.

Unlike the work plan leading to the implementation of the JCPOA, the agreement did not commit the IAEA to ‘close’ its investigation or settle for a series of joint meetings and Iranian misrepresentations or declarations. . The IAEA/Iran joint statement denied Iran the ability to simply “check the boxes” of a project without honest cooperation. As Grossi said, “There is no artificial time limit [for concluding the investigation]there is no predefined result, there is no predefined name for what I am going to do.

The IAEA reported in June that, in accordance with the agreed timetable, Iran provided the agency on March 19 with information described as “primarily information that Iran had previously provided to the Agency, but also new information, which was then assessed by the Agency”. The information provided by Iran did not answer all of the Agency’s questions. The IAEA submitted additional questions to Iran on April 4. The IAEA and Iran met in Tehran on April 12, May 7 and May 17. 3 and 4.” Still, the IAEA found the explanations not technically credible.

IAEA member states must support Grossi’s quest for answers.

Read the full analysis in PDF format here.


1. Andrea Stricker is Deputy Director of the Nonproliferation and Biodefense Program at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies (FDD) and Associate Researcher at the FDD. ↩

2. For example, Grossi wrote in a report on backups from May 2022: “[Some of the] isotopically modified particles [found at Turquz Abad] must be from another unknown location. See: IAEA Director General, “NPT Safeguards Agreement with the Islamic Republic of Iran”, GOV/2022/26, May 30, 2022, https://isis-online.org/uploads/iaea-reports/documents/gov2022 -26 .pdf. ↩

3. David Albright and Sarah Burkhard, “Fourth Nuclear Weapons-Related Test Site Located: Another Parchin Site, Other Undeclared Nuclear Material Possible,” Institute for Science and International Security, September 7, 2022, https://isis-online.org/isis-reports/detail/the-fourth-nuclear-weapons-related-testing-site-located/. ↩

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Florida Cancer Specialists and Research Institute Physicians Present Advances in Cancer Care at Global Oncology Gathering https://cerib.org/florida-cancer-specialists-and-research-institute-physicians-present-advances-in-cancer-care-at-global-oncology-gathering/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 16:33:51 +0000 https://cerib.org/florida-cancer-specialists-and-research-institute-physicians-present-advances-in-cancer-care-at-global-oncology-gathering/ Enter Wall Street with StreetInsider Premium. Claim your one week free trial here. Fort Myers, Fla., Sept. 08, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Research conducted by Florida Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, LLC (FCS) is among the latest breakthrough developments and discoveries in cancer care presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress being […]]]>

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Fort Myers, Fla., Sept. 08, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Research conducted by Florida Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, LLC (FCS) is among the latest breakthrough developments and discoveries in cancer care presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress being held this week in Paris, France. Several FCS Board-certified medical oncologists are first authors and/or co-authors of eleven cancer research studies that will be shared at the gathering of oncologists, researchers, patient advocates and pharmaceutical representatives. With over 25,000 members worldwide, ESMO is the leading professional organization for medical oncology.

The following FCS physician researchers will present their research results in oral presentations, poster discussions and/or communication sessions:

  • Lucio N. Gordan, MDChief Medical Officer of Therapeutics & Analytics, first author of a collaborative study with co-authors of FCS President & Managing Physician Michael Diaz, MD, Anjan J. Patel, MD, Matthew A. Fink, MD, David Wenk, MD and also in collaboration with Illumina partners evaluating the use of tissue and liquid biopsy in advanced NSCLC in a large community practice in the United States; and a poster presentation in partnership with IntegraConnect on outcomes when patients (pts) with stage 4 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC-4) harboring oncogenic factors (OD) are initially treated without inhibitors of tyrosine kinase (TKI).
  • Manish R. Patel, MD, Director of the FCS Drug Development Unit, an oral presentation as first author of a Phase Ia study of GDC-6036 as monotherapy in patients with advanced solid tumors with a KRAS G12C mutation ; poster presentations including the first author of a study examining combination antibody therapy in patients with recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; a first in a human study testing pharmacological treatments of patients with advanced solid tumors resistant to boosted inhibitors; a Phase Ia study evaluating the safety and efficacy of monotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer with a genetic mutation; and presented presentations on a Phase I dose escalation and expansion study evaluating the safety and efficacy of monotherapy in patients with solid tumors; and a study evaluating the results of an antibody-drug conjugate showing antitumor activity in advanced solid tumors.
  • Sunil Gandhi, MD, FACP and James A. Reeves, Jr., MDa phase II combination immunotherapy study in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.
  • Maen Hussein, MDa study evaluating the overall survival of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer four years after treatment.
  • Judy Wang, MDAssociate Director of the FCS Drug Development Unit, including co-author of an oral presentation of preliminary evidence of clinical activity from Phase I and Ib trials of the CLK/DYRK inhibitor cirtuvivint (CIRT) in patients subjects with advanced solid tumors, and a poster presentation in the phase I study of SAR444245 (SAR’245) as monotherapy (mono) and in combination with pembrolizumab (pembro) or cetuximab (cetux) in patients (pts ) with advanced solid tumors.

FCS President and Physician Director Michael Diaz, MD said, “We are proud to be at the forefront of advances in cancer care. Through our clinical research program, we are able to provide our patients with the most promising new drugs and treatments available.

“Research conducted at our three FCS drug development units and 37 FCS clinical sites across Florida is contributing to breakthrough advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and survival,” said Gustavo A. Fonseca, MD, FACP, FCS Director of Clinical Research. “We welcome this opportunity to join colleagues and peers around the world who share our commitment to finding a cure for cancer. »

The ESMO 2022 Congress is a global stage for the exchange of practice-changing data and multidisciplinary conversations that will drive transformative cancer therapies. All study abstracts will be published online in the ESMO Congress 2022 Abstract Book, a supplement to ESMO’s Official Journal, Annals of Oncology.

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About Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, LLC: (FLCancer.com)

Recognized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) with a National Clinical Trial Participation Award, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute (FCS) offers patients access to more clinical trials than any private practice of oncology in Florida. The majority of new cancer drugs recently approved for use in the United States have been studied in clinical trials with the participation of Florida cancer specialists.

Founded in 1984, Florida Cancer Specialists has built a national reputation for excellence that is reflected in exceptional, compassionate patient care driven by innovative clinical research, cutting-edge technologies and advanced treatments, including targeted therapies, treatments based on genomics and immunotherapy. Our highest values ​​are embodied by our exceptional team of highly qualified and dedicated physicians, clinicians and staff.

*Before approval

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The Venice Film Festival will present 13 films supported by the Doha Film Institute https://cerib.org/the-venice-film-festival-will-present-13-films-supported-by-the-doha-film-institute/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 10:16:52 +0000 https://cerib.org/the-venice-film-festival-will-present-13-films-supported-by-the-doha-film-institute/ The selection includes films from Algeria, Egypt, France, Jordan, Indonesia, Morocco, Palestine, Syria and Tunisia, highlighting DFI’s support for independent voices in cinema. The Venice International Film Festival, which kicks off August 31 and runs until September 10, will screen 13 films supported by the Doha Film Institute (DFI). The festival aims to publicize and […]]]>

The selection includes films from Algeria, Egypt, France, Jordan, Indonesia, Morocco, Palestine, Syria and Tunisia, highlighting DFI’s support for independent voices in cinema.

The Venice International Film Festival, which kicks off August 31 and runs until September 10, will screen 13 films supported by the Doha Film Institute (DFI).

The festival aims to publicize and promote international cinema in all its forms: art, entertainment and industry.

Highlighting the diversity of DFI’s support for independent voices in film, the selection includes films from Algeria, Egypt, France, Jordan, Indonesia, Morocco, Palestine, Syria and Tunisia.

Speaking about the event, Fatma Hassan Alremaihi, Managing Director of DFI, said: “We are extremely proud to present 13 diverse films supported by DFI at this year’s Venice Film Festival, underlining our commitment to supporting emerging Arab talents and filmmakers from around the world. the globe. The selection includes daring, independent and avant-garde films from around the world, which are distinguished by the diversity of their themes and the way the filmmakers approach their stories through innovative techniques that push the boundaries of conventional cinema. Their debut in Venice will mark the start of an exciting journey for all of these films, and I congratulate the teams behind them for their inclusion in this prestigious festival.

Selected in the Orizzonti section, an international competition dedicated to films that represent the latest aesthetic and expressive trends is Autobiography (Indonesia, Singapore, Philippines, Poland, Germany, France, Qatar) led by Makbul Mubarak, and nurtured in Qumra.

Another Qumra project, Nezuh (Syria, Lebanon, Qatar), directed by Soudade Kaadan, was chosen for the Orizzonti Extra selection, which includes up to 10 world works demonstrating original creativity.

the last queen (Algeria, France, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Qatar), also raised in Qumra, is in the official selection of the 19th edition of the Giornate degli Autori, an independent sidebar of the Venice Film Festival, modeled on the prestigious “Quinzaine des Réalisateurs of the Cannes Film Festival.

Dirty Difficult Dangerous (France, Lebanon, Germany, Qatar), recipient of the Institute’s 2019 Spring Grants, is also featured in the Official Selection of the Giornate degli Autori in Venice.

Screening at Critics’ Week, a parallel section of the Venice International Film Festival organized by the Union of Italian Film Critics (SNCCI) is queens (Morocco, France, Belgium, Qatar), directed by Yasmine Benkiran.

Six films supported by the DFI are taking part in the 10th edition of the Final Cut in Venice, a workshop which aims to provide strong support for the production of films from Africa and Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria .

These include InshAllah a boy (Jordan, Egypt, France, Qatar), by Amjad Al Rasheed; Black light (Algeria, France, Qatar) by Karim Bensalah; In the wings (Morocco, Tunisia, France, Belgium, Norway, Qatar) by Afef Ben Mahmoud and Khalil Benkirane; A Fidai movie (Palestine, Germany, Qatar) by Kamal Aljafari; Suspended (Lebanon, Qatar), directed by Myriam El Hajj; and land of women (Egypt, France, Denmark, Qatar) by Nada Riyadh.

Two films supported by the Institute are selected for the Venice Gap-Financing Market which includes The 67th summer (France, Egypt, Austria, Germany, Qatar) by Abu Bakr Shawky, and 5 seasons of revolution (Syria, Germany, Norway, Netherlands, Qatar) by Lina – No Notion Films, Lina.

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Should democracies ever lie? | Lowy Institute https://cerib.org/should-democracies-ever-lie-lowy-institute/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 04:26:46 +0000 https://cerib.org/should-democracies-ever-lie-lowy-institute/ Should liberal democracies ever tell lies? This is one of the questions raised by reports that Facebook and Twitter recently took down a network of accounts, originating in the United States, which “covertly sought to influence users in the Middle East and Asia with pro-Western perspectives on international politics, including the invasion of Ukraine by […]]]>

Should liberal democracies ever tell lies?

This is one of the questions raised by reports that Facebook and Twitter recently took down a network of accounts, originating in the United States, which “covertly sought to influence users in the Middle East and Asia with pro-Western perspectives on international politics, including the invasion of Ukraine by Russia”.

Growing awareness of state-sponsored disinformation has prompted the West to call for rediscover the dark arts of information. For example, Robert Gates, the former US Secretary of Defense and longtime CIA officer, argues that:

“Russia…mounted sophisticated hacking and disinformation campaigns to interfere in the 2016 Brexit vote in the UK, the 2016 presidential election in the US and the 2017 presidential election in France . The United States has the same technologies; it just lacks a strategy to apply them.

But the myth of adroit American information operations winning the Cold War is largely a myth. Thomas Ridd’s definitive study of information warfare, Active Measures: The Secret History of Disinformation and Political Warfare, shows that US interference in disinformation has had very limited reach and effects. He concludes that “for liberal democracies…being the recipients of active measures will undermine democratic institutions – and yielding to the temptation to design and deploy them will have the same result. It is impossible to excel in disinformation and democracy at the same time.

Ever since humans have fought, denial and deception have been part of warfare.

Canberra seems to agree. On February 22, the Ministry of Defense issued an unusually detailed press release describing the Chinese PLA Navy’s “lasing” of an Australian P-8A Poseidon, which ended with the statement that “Australia does not engage in the dissemination of false information or disinformation.”

But is it completely true? Ever since humans have fought, denial and deception have been part of warfare. Another dramatized film, Ground Meat Operation, just released and tells the true story of Britain’s brilliant use of a fake dead British officer to deceive the Germans in 1943. It would be surprising if Ukraine’s successful information operations were all strictly truthful. During a conflict, Australians would expect Defense Information Warfare Division be equally creative.

So maybe the answer is that liberal democracies can lie in war but never in peacetime.

A Ukrainian tank driver on the front line in the Donetsk region on August 19 amid the Russian invasion (Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images)

But what about the “grey area”? Most definitions of this dark zone between peace and war place information warfare in the middle. The term is central to Australia Defense Strategy Update 2020 (although it was not mentioned in the 2016 Defense White Paper). The gray area encompasses Chinese maneuvering for strategic advantage in the Australia region; its progressive militarization of contested features of the South China Sea, its efforts to gain a military foothold in the Southwest Pacific, and the PLA’s tightrope control on water and in the air.

This competition has spilled over into the news space as Australia and China advance conflicting accounts of dangerous encounters, like the incident in February. This is the context of the unusually explicit assertion by the head of the Australian Air Force, Air Marshal Robert Chipman, that Chinese anti-aircraft capabilities in the South China Sea cannot “means you cannot provide military effects to achieve your interests when operating against China.”

How should liberal democracies engage in information warfare? Should they limit themselves to truth, public diplomacy and transparency campaigns. Or is twisting the truth sometimes necessary and justified?

There are no easy answers to such questions, but these are the ones Australia will have to grapple with more often, especially as China becomes more assertive in Australia’s physical and informational space. .

There is no evidence that the accounts suspended by Facebook and Twitter for “coordinated inauthentic behavior” were spreading fake news, but they used “fake personas” and posed as “independent media”. Is there a significant difference? If not, how can covert action be justified?

And what about cyber? Is there a valid distinction between disinformation and offensive cyber operations? These range from industrial sabotage to the more subtle manipulation of data. The Australian Signals Directorate’s offensive cyber capability will triple in size over the next 10 years. Although the primary purpose of this capability is to support Australian Defense Force operations, its use is not limited to wartime.

Clearly, liberal democracies should, as Ridd advises, resist the temptation to spread disinformation in situations other than war. But in escalating competition without war, it’s not hard to imagine situations in which the benefits of such action might outweigh the costs. For example, what if decisive Chinese action in the South China Sea or against Taiwan could be prevented by spreading fake news or covertly amplifying a true story?

There are no easy answers to such questions, but these are the ones Australia will have to grapple with more often, especially as China becomes more assertive in Australia’s physical and informational space. . Without a strategic compass, Canberra could be guided by tactical needs and bureaucratic imperatives. To avoid this, Australia and other liberal democracies should think about and develop a more coherent concept for information operations.

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